Arthritis Tips: Make your car more user friendly!

Is you car a pain?  Not just because of gas prices but because it makes you literally hurt to use it? Let’s start with simply unlocking and opening the door which could be painful if you have arthritis affecting your hands.  There is adaptive equipment to help you enjoy going for a ride in the car.

This device comes in handy for opening your car

This device comes in handy for opening your car

 

www.brokenbeauties.com/comfort-mobility/livin…

This tool can making ulocking the door or turning the ignition a snap

This tool can making ulocking the door or turning the ignition a snapwww.dkimages.com/.../Security/Keys/Keys-02.htmlThis gives leverage to make turning any key easier

 

www.lifesolutionsplus.com/household-products-…

This device will help make getting out of your car easier

This device will help make getting out of your car easierwww.aidsforarthritis.com/catalog/clearance.htmlYou can add a satin pillowcase to your seat to make sliding in and out easier OR and heated seat cushion

www.healiohealth.com/tek9.asp?pg=products…

This gas cap wrench makes it easier to fill up, at least easier on the hands not necessarily the wallet.
This gas cap wrench makes it easier to fill up, at least easier on the hands not necessarily the wallet.

Also, remember to keep a Ziploc bag in the glovebox if your joints are swollen to use ice.

 

Think Big to Move Big- Parkinson’s Exercise Class

          Parkinsons disease is a disorder that affects the nerve cells in the part of the brain (substantia nigra) that helps control your body’s movement.  Symptoms of Parkinsons disease progress over time and initially the symptoms usually affect only one side of the body.  Symptoms often include:

·        Involuntary tremor

·        Muscle stiffness

·        Shuffling steps when walking

·        Decreased arm swing   

·        Impaired balance and coordination

·        Impaired voice quality

 

Daily exercise is one of the most important things that you can to do to help counteract the effects of Parkinsons disease.  Physical activity has been shown to increase blood flow to parts of the brain as well as to the muscles in your body.  It is now thought that exercise may help slow down the loss of nerve cells in the body making movement easier.

 

The focus of “Think Big to Move Big” exercise class is to improve mobility in individuals with Parkinsons disease.  When you have been diagnosed with Parkinsons disease, it is very important to stay moving and keep active in order to maintain optimal function.   This exercise class will help you:

·        Improve Strength

·        Decrease stiffness

·        Improve balance and walking

·        Decrease fall risk and improve safety

·        Bring together members of the community for discussion, fun activities, and education

 

“Think Big to Move Big” exercise class meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 11am at 3875 E. Overland Rd, Meridian.  Please call 489-5060 for further information or if you are interested in attending this exercise class. Try your first class free of charge.  Cost is $35 per month.

SLIERS Movie Stars

Living with Parkinson’s Disease: What Physical Therapy Can do for You!

Parkinson’s disease occurs when the brain does not produce enough dopamine, a chemical that is necessary to help your body control movement and coordination.  Because of the lack of dopamine, your muscles become stiff making many activities of daily living more challenging.   The most common symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include:

·        Muscle stiffness

·        Stooped Posture with shuffling steps when walking

·        Decreased arm swing   

·        Impaired balance

·        Involuntary tremor

·        Freezing

·        Impaired voice quality

 

The focus of Physical Therapy is to improve mobility in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.  When you have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s, it is very important to stay moving and keep active in order to maintain flexibility, improve posture and make movement easier overall.    Types of exercise include:

·    Stretching to help decrease muscle stiffness making movement easier. Your trunk often becomes stiff making it difficult to get in and out of bed.

·    Strengthening exercises to increase overall muscle strength to help will all activities of daily living

·    Gait training to help decrease risk for falls and improve ability to walk in all environments. Often during walking individuals have decreased arm swing and short shuffling steps

·    Balance and Posture training – to help improve overall posture, balance and decrease your risk for falling.  Improving posture can also improve back and neck pain.  Therapy helps your natural balance reactions to kick in and help you maintain your stability. 

 

Exercise has been shown to be very helpful in compensating for the changes brought on by this disease and improve performance overall.  The best time to take advantage of motor skill learning is early in the disease process.  Don’t forget to keep moving.

 

Jill Billing, PT, MBA

Neurological Rehabilitation Services

Talus Clinic 489-5060