Pediatric Core Strengthening Class

Core Peds

Free Infant Massage Classes for Parents

 Learn how to:

  • Relieve stress for your infant and you
  •  Ease colic and promote healthy digestion
  • Improve immunity and circulation
  • Promote relaxation and deep sleep
  • Aid growth and development  
  • Soothe your baby and have fun!

When: Class A: Saturdays May 2 nd , 16 th and 23 rd or Class B: May 2 nd , 3 rd and 16 th .  From 10:00 -11:30 am.

Where : St Luke’s Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Pediatrics 600 East Riverpark Lane, Suite 105 (off Park Center Blvd) Boise, Idaho 83706

Cost: Attend all 3 consecutive classes for FREE . (additional classes and dates available at regular rate.)

Teacher: Sima Tavazoie, MPT, CIMT is a Certified Infant Massage Teacher and has over 10 years of experience as a physical therapist specializing in pediatrics.

Pre-Registration required: Please call 870-9746 or email at simapt@gmail.com to register. Be sure to leave your name, phone number, infant’s name and age.

Supplies: I will provide you with massage oil and handouts. Over the 3 days of classes you will learn:

· The benefits of infant massage

· The optimal time for you to massage your baby

· How to massage your baby’s legs, arms, tummy, chest, back, and face

· How to read your baby’s non-verbal cues

· How to provide infant massage to relieve discomfort associated with colic, constipation and gas

· How to soothe and comfort your baby and feel confident while having fun!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Infants between the ages of 3 weeks and pre-crawling age (~ 8 months). In this class only you will be massaging your baby and demonstrations will be performed using dolls. Both parents are invited to attend.

· call soon to register~ Space is limited*

Health Care Reality Forum

Date:
Tuesday, April 14, 2009
Time:
7:00am – 12:00pm
Location:
Nampa Civic Center
Street:
311 Third Street South
City/Town:
Nampa, ID
 
Phone:
4635871
Email:

n71703043800_6947am – 9:30am – Breakfast & Keynote Speaker, Coach Chris Peterson – Boise State Football Coach

Coach Petersen will share his personal experience
about the impact comprehensive medical care
had on his son’s ability to heal.

9:30am – Noon – Health Care Education Series

$25 includes breakfast and event

Panelists

Ed Dahlberg
CEO of St. Luke’s Health System
Joe Messmer
CEO of Mercy Medical Center
Doug Dammrose, MD
Blue Cross of Idaho – Chief Medical Officer
John Stellmon
President of Regence BlueShield of Idaho
Tom Patterson, MD
Saltzer Medical Group – Immunization Coalition
Senator John McGee
Senate Health and Welfare Committee
Moderator
Dee Sarton – Idaho’s News Channel 7

Parenting Class- Sensory Integration Education Training

Presented by Kavita Patil, MOTR/L and Krystal Butgereit, MSOTR/L, St. Luke’s ♦ Idaho Elks Pediatric Rehabilitation Services

 

Date: Thursday, April 2nd

Time: 7-8:30 p.m.

Location: St. Luke’s Meridian, lower level conference rooms

Registration Deadline: Friday, March 27th

 

During this in-service we will discuss what Sensory Integration is, how and why it is used, and how it can be functionally used in the home and school environments.  We will learn through lecture, open discussion, and hands on application. 

 

Childcare is provided, spots are limited

 

To sign up, please call Jasmynn at 489-5880

Don’t lose out on therapy because of tough financial times!

What can you do if you have pain but you are afraid of generating a big medical bill?

 

Look for free services offered in the community.  SLIERS has free screenings available. Although this is not a substitute for seeing your doctor if you have a serious condition, it may be just what you need to learn a few tips or exercises to alleviate your pain. 

 

Look for low cost exercise classes.  Sometimes just getting moving helps your body to get stronger and more flexible and can help reduce pain and stiffness.

 

Look for free seminars. For example, support groups or web sites that are specific to your diagnosis or problem.  Chatting with others who have your same condition can help you to learn practical tips that work for them. 

 

Look for prevention programs.  These usually take the form of education or instruction in exercises.  For example, SLIERS has a Skiing Injury Prevention course with lectures by physicians and exercise programs crafted by physical therapists that was free and presented to the community in early Fall.

                            

If you need to see a therapist here are a few tips that can make your experience short and sweet.

 

Be prepared for your first visit.  Fill out paperwork in advance if possible.  You will have more time to think about the questions and you can look up things like medications, surgeries giving the therapist a good knowledge base to start from.

 

Choose the direction of your treatment.  Make sure you identify your main issues and emphasize your goals.  Don’t waste time on what is not important to you.    

 

Let the therapist know what your preferences are.  The final outcome of treatment should include an exercise program.  Make sure it fits your lifestyle.   Do you belong to a gym? Do you want exercises that you can do at home?  If something has worked well for you in the past, tell your therapist so time is not spent on treatments that may not be as helpful. 

 

Make sure your schedule reflects your treatment needs.  If you can do exercises at home, do them there.  Use treatment time for advancing exercises, treatment components you can’t do on your own or learning self management techniques that help you achieve your goals.

 

Take an active roll and let your therapist know in advance of your desire to get the most out of your treatment in the least number of visits.

 

Susan Gordon

SLIERS, Downtown

489-4040

Stay Strong and Get Moving- Multiple Sclerosis Exercise Class

Exercise is an important component of a healthy lifestyle, but it is especially important if you are living with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis affects approximately 400,000 people in the United States, and attacks the nerves in the brain and/or spinal cord.  Although symptoms vary widely they can include:

 

·        Muscle stiffness

·        Fatigue

·        Difficulty Walking  

·        Impaired balance and coordination

·        Dizziness

·        Visual deficits

·        Memory and cognition deficits

 

Daily exercise is one of the most important things that you can to do to help counteract the effects of multiple sclerosis.  Studies show that various kinds of physical activity can help people with MS maintain their mobility longer, improve balance, strength and flexibility which are key to maintaining endurance and helping prevent muscle loss. Research has shown individuals participating in a MS exercise class show significant improvement in overall fatigue as well as improved strength and mobility.

 

The focus of “Stay Strong and Get Moving” exercise class is to improve mobility and strength in individuals with multiple sclerosis.  When you have been diagnosed with MS, it is very important to keep active in order to maintain optimal function.   This exercise class will help you:

·        Improve Strength and flexibility

·        Improve energy level

·        Decrease stiffness

·        Improve balance and walking

·        Bring together members of the community for discussion, fun activities, and education

 

“Stay Strong and Get Moving” exercise class meets Mondays and Wednesdays at 12pm at 3875 E. Overland Rd, Meridian.  Please call 489-5060 for further information or if you are interested in attending this exercise class. Try your first class free of charge.  Cost is $25 per month.

Think Big to Move Big- Parkinson’s Exercise Class

          Parkinsons disease is a disorder that affects the nerve cells in the part of the brain (substantia nigra) that helps control your body’s movement.  Symptoms of Parkinsons disease progress over time and initially the symptoms usually affect only one side of the body.  Symptoms often include:

·        Involuntary tremor

·        Muscle stiffness

·        Shuffling steps when walking

·        Decreased arm swing   

·        Impaired balance and coordination

·        Impaired voice quality

 

Daily exercise is one of the most important things that you can to do to help counteract the effects of Parkinsons disease.  Physical activity has been shown to increase blood flow to parts of the brain as well as to the muscles in your body.  It is now thought that exercise may help slow down the loss of nerve cells in the body making movement easier.

 

The focus of “Think Big to Move Big” exercise class is to improve mobility in individuals with Parkinsons disease.  When you have been diagnosed with Parkinsons disease, it is very important to stay moving and keep active in order to maintain optimal function.   This exercise class will help you:

·        Improve Strength

·        Decrease stiffness

·        Improve balance and walking

·        Decrease fall risk and improve safety

·        Bring together members of the community for discussion, fun activities, and education

 

“Think Big to Move Big” exercise class meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 11am at 3875 E. Overland Rd, Meridian.  Please call 489-5060 for further information or if you are interested in attending this exercise class. Try your first class free of charge.  Cost is $35 per month.